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Architecture


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Architecture


“The sun never knew how great it was until it hit the side of a building.”
— Louis I. Kahn
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Coleman Oval Park


Coleman Oval Park


COLEMAN OVAL PARK | 2012, PROJECT COMPLETED | NEW YORK, NY

The Client: Architecture For Humanity

The Challenge: The Coleman Oval Park project was created to bring awareness to a mostly unused park under the Manhattan Bridge adjacent to a newly renovated skate park in the Lower East Side. Under the leadership of Architecture for Humanity, it was the team’s goal to create a multi-sensory installation that would engage the surrounding community into thinking of different permanent solutions for the park.

The Concept: The team took inspiration from the street grids of lower Manhattan and the idea of a unique urban web. Our installation, a series of splayed geometric lines created by rope attached to existing trees on the site, intended to break up the space to help residents view the space in a different light. 

 

 

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Yongsan Masterplan


Yongsan Masterplan


Yongsan International Business District Redevelopment

Competition - Est. Completion 2016| Seoul, Korea

Firm: Studio Daniel Libeskind

The Challenge: The Youngsan project is a masterplan redevelopment in Seoul, Korea. The project challenged the studio to redevelop over 30 million square feet of area into a thriving business district.

The Solution: Our team’s solution was to break the site area into distinct islands, creating iconographic neighborhoods geared towards different demographics and uses. Each area is characterized through building heights, communal areas, and material uses. This new urban development will boast residential, shopping, cultural, educational, and transportation hub areas. My duties on the project included study model exploration, presentation model building, 3D modeling, and drafting. With such a large project area, numerous levels of study were required in order to fully understand the site’s complexity.  This project is projected to be finished in 2016.

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Zhang Zhidong and Modern Industrial Museum


Zhang Zhidong and Modern Industrial Museum


The Zhang Zhidong and Modern Industrial Museum | In Construction | Wuhan, China

Firm: Studio Daniel Libeskind

The Challenge: Located in the steelmaking capital of eastern China, The Zhang Zhidong and Modern Industrial Museum, was designed to balance three narrative themes within an integrated building and landscape. I was involved in the initial conceptual design, and assisted with designing early concepts, developing the landscape around the site, and building study models.

The Concept: We created the museum with the foundation of three themes, each of which have a dedicated floor, are: the life of Zhang Zhidong, a 19th-century leader in government who inspired the movement towards modernization that established the steel industry in Wuhan; the steel industry; and the history of the city of Wuhan. The boat like design pays homage to the industrial strengths of the city.


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Kurdistan Museum


Kurdistan Museum


Kurdistan Museum | Erbil, Kurdistan

Firm: Studio Daniel Libeskind

The Challenge: The City of Erbil in Kurdistan has a goal to create “the first major center in the Kurdistan Region for the history and culture of the Kurdish people.” 

The Concept: Situated at the base of an ancient Citadel in the center of Erbil, the museum’s shape is created from four interlocking geometric volumes that represent the regions of Kurdistan: Iran, Iraq, Syria, Turkey. A line that intersects the volumes, creating angular fragments, is meant to represent the past and future of the region and Kurdish people.  A courtyard space at the juncture of the lines refers to those found in the Citadel and throughout the city of Erbil, and a river feature that runs through the museum is meant to evoke the waterways and fertile valleys of the Kurdish region.